Review Tag Categories

Welcome!  All of my reviews are tagged with the general reading level, genre, and diverse groups featured.  Some are also tagged with the author, illustrator, series, or topics.

Every week I post a review of a fiction book (everything from picture books up to adult fiction, but usually chapter books for 2nd-8th grade) for Fiction Friday.

As I have the time and inclination, I try to review other books (usually non-fiction) during the week.  These other reviews are under Book Reviews.

Sometimes I might review more than one book on a subject, and Compare and Contrast two or more books.

Also as I am starting to build up some reviews, I am beginning to do Book Lists.

If a category does not have a hyperlink yet, that means I had not posted any reviews in that category as of the last update of this page, but I do plan to review books in that category.

Books by Reading Level:

All Ages – These are books that can be enjoyed by a wide age range, albeit in different ways.

Board Books – Now that I’ve started reviewing board books they have a separate category.

Picture Books – depending on the age and reading level of the child, these could be read aloud to them or read independently by an older child.  Some picture books are intended solely for older students, I try to categorize those differently.

Early Reader – intended for a child to read alone, these typically have a low word count and lots of text support.  They span the kindergarten to about third grade age range.  They could also be read aloud to younger children.

Early Chapter Books – These are early chapter books, mainly intended for the first or second grade student who is ready to read longer and more complex stories, but still needs a simpler vocabulary and support from pictures.  For more about these three categories, see this post.

Elementary Chapter Books – Chapter books intended for first through third or fourth grade students.  These typically have shorter chapters, simpler vocabulary, and younger protagonists than middle grade books, but pictures will be less frequent than an early chapter book and readers are expected to be able to decipher new vocabulary.  Compared to early chapter books, these are aimed at the more confident reader, but some children will be reading both for a period of time.

Middle Grade Books – These are chapter books intended for 4th and 5th grade students (upper elementary) and/or middle school students (6th to 8th grade).  Depending on an individual student’s reading level and maturity, there is a lot of variation in these books.  Some are aimed specifically at a particular grade or age level.  Individual reviews will have more information.

Occasionally I review picture books (usually non-fiction) intended primarily for the middle grades.  I typically include those here as well.

Teen Reads – These are chapter books which by mature content, age of protagonists, or complex text are best for students in high school or early college.  These are sometimes labeled as YA by publishers, but this tag also includes non-fiction.

Adult – These are books which are primarily intended to be read by adults, and which are marketed at grown-ups.  Content may at times be appropriate for mature or well-read high school students.  Academic works are also included here.

Books by Genre:

Biographies – also includes autobiographies and memoir

Non-Fiction – other than biographies

Poetry – at least part of the book is in verse, or poems are included, or it’s about a poet or about poetry

Play – also includes Reader’s Theater

Graphic Novels – comics, graphic novels, or manga.  Illuminated books are categorized by their genre.

Realistic Fiction – present day setting, could potentially have happened.

Historical Fiction – has a historical setting.

Mysteries – something gets solved, be it crime or puzzle.  The mystery is a main focus.

Fantasy – Magic, dragons, incredible things happening.

Science fiction – Intense technology, dystopian societies, space travel, or other futuristic things.

Romance – at its core, the book is a love story between two characters, including star-crossed lovers.

Books by or about special interest groups:

African American History – the main category on this blog at the moment

Black History Month – Compilations and other books specifically written for, or useful during, Black History Month

________________ – Because the majority of fiction I review here has black protagonists, I don’t currently tag those books.

African – Books about Africa, set in Africa, or with African protagonists, distinct from African American.  If a book is about an African in America, I will tag it with both.

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Latin@ – Books with Latina or Latino protagonists or about Hispanic history, etc.

Central or South American – Books set there or featuring Central or South American protagonists as distinct from Latin@ books.

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Asian – Books with Asian or Asian-American protagonists, or about Asian history, etc.

–  Indian – Because I have a great number of books to review about the Indian subcontinent and Indian immigrants, I have made a separate category.

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Middle Eastern – Books set in that area or featuring Middle Eastern characters who have immigrated elsewhere.

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indigenous – Books featuring indigenous peoples from anywhere in the world, such as First Nations books, or books about the Māori.

– Native American – I hope to read some books about Native American culture as well as some Native American fiction.

Hawaii – books dealing with the unique mix of cultures that is Hawaiian, or featuring native Hawaiian characters.

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disability – books featuring people with physical, mental, or emotional difficulties

–  deaf or hoh – because I read a lot of books and articles about this topic, I am anticipating that I will need a separate tag for deaf and hard of hearing books.

–  autism – similar to the above, books about autism, by autistic authors, or with protagonists on the autistic spectrum.

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adoption – books that deal with adoption themes

foster care – books that deal with the foster care system, including out of home care through kinship, foster families, institutions, or informal arrangements.

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transracial families – families that through adoption or marriage are multiracial

multicultural families – more than one culture or ethnicity within the family but not necessarily more than one race.  For example, a Christian/Muslim marriage or a woman of Polish descent and a man of German descent.

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homosexual, bisexual – fiction or non-fiction books featuring a main character who is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or asexual.

transgender – books featuring a protagonist who is transgender or intersex.

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substance abuse – books where the protagonist or a friend or family member deals with alcoholism or other substance abuse as a major theme of the book.

Other:

Novels for Boys – novels particularly aimed at boys (although they may interest girls also)

STEM PoC Role Models – because so many books about people of color focus on narrow ranges (like athletes), I have a special interest in both fiction and non-fiction books showcasing people of color in science and technology leadership roles.

Academic writings – Books (or articles, essays, etc.) that are written for an academic or scholarly audience rather than laypeople.

Black Ballerinas – fiction or non-fiction books where the primary focus is a character of color or indigenous person who does ballet or other dance.

Black Cowboys – also pioneers that settled the American West.

Diverse and Disabled – books about PoC or indigenous who also happen to have some form of disability.

How I Got the Book:

librarycheckout – checked the book out from one of the libraries that I work at or which my family patronizes.  This is probably half my reading material, but not always half my reviews (because of needing to return the books, or the books not being diverse).

boughtit – I purchased this item myself, probably from a used bookstore, library sale, thrift store, or online, but maybe from a book fair or a regular store.  I didn’t get it from Target or the dollar store.

giftedtome – somebody gave me or my family this book, either off of a wish list or on their own accord.  Right now I am also including free books in this category too, because I get my free books from the library or little library boxes or exchanges, not fancy ARCs.  If a publisher or author gives me a free book then I might make another category.

targetpicks – I try to encourage Target to keep their book section stocked and to be more diverse by buying a diverse book there every month.  Often there are not a lot of choices, so it leads me to pick up things I otherwise wouldn’t.

dollarstorefinds – the dollar store is really cheap, every so often I take ten bucks and see if I can find that many diverse books there.  Like the previous tag, it often leads me to things I never would have chosen on my own.  Some of them are awful, some of them are great, but it is always interesting.

ebooks – this tag indicates an ebook version was read.  Most of the time this is a free ebook from Project Gutenberg or another site.  In those cases the book will also be tagged freebie (which is also used for other free materials such as short stories, comics, or coloring pages).  Some times I get ebooks through my local public library, in which case I would use the library tag as well.

thriftstorefinds – after a really nice thrift store haul, I started using this tag, but it’s in conjunction with the boughtit tag.  If I end up using it a lot, I might go back and remove the duplicate.

borrowed – I borrowed this book, but not from a library.

There also lots of other tags you can browse through, but these are the standard tags I always use.

Updated September 1st, 2017.

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