Web: Board Book Lists

Some other diverse board book lists.

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So, a while back I mentioned that when I started reviewing board books, it was difficult to find diverse board book lists.  That wasn’t so much because they don’t exist, as because most of the ones I found have problematic content, or are board and picture books mixed together.  Here are a few pretty good ones.

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We Sang You Home back cover with text “When wishes come true.”

AICL has a great list of Native board books.

This is important because most other lists (including some I’ll share) have poor indigenous representation.  I always look for a review from AICL or an #ownvoices reviewer, and check if the author/illustrator are Native.

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Dim Sum for Everyone! by Grace Lin.

PragmaticMom has a good top ten of multicultural board books.  The caveat is that I would NOT recommend Mama, Mama, Do You Love Me? – see above for better Native books.

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It’s Ramadan, Curious George by Hena Khan, illustrated by Mary O’Keefe Young.

While it wasn’t recommended as a “diverse books list”, I loved that most of the books on this list are diverse, including Hawaiian, Native, and specialty religious books that are diverse.

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Whose Knees Are These by Jabari Asim, illustrated by LeUyen Pham.

And finally, Drivel and Drool has a list broken down by ethnicity of the main character, with again the caveat to please check the Native books against AICL’s listing as some are problematic.  I like that this book includes some nonfiction board books.

 

Board Book Reviews are Back

TL;DR ~ New page for board book reviews!  This series will no longer be in chronological order.

Writing these blog maintenance posts is always a bit weird.  I don’t like to put the information in a book review, but can’t think of another way to get the word out to those of you who read these posts via WordPress or email.

The last time I had the camera, one of the things I got done was photographing a good number of board books from our diverse board book collection.  However, in real life books don’t always stay on the shelf (or to be photographed pile) the way they start off.

Our eighth addition to the board book collection didn’t get any pictures taken, even though I had a review all written and ready to go.  This is probably a testament to how much the kids have enjoyed that book, although it could just as well have been me absentmindedly moving it.

After that, I just stalled out on doing board book reviews, even as we built up a pretty impressive collection.  However lately, having seen a few people find my blog based on this review series, it reminded me why I started it – there aren’t many resources available for finding diverse board books.

So I went ahead and made a page for listing all of the diverse board books we own, and added links to those I’ve reviewed.  From now on, these reviews will be skipping around a bit, but probably still roughly chronological.  The reviews are short, but photographing and formatting them takes a long time, especially if the book’s in heavy use and I can’t lay hands on it to photograph!

Web: Some #100indigenousbooks Lists

As I introduced earlier, this year I began a new project – to read 100 books by indigenous authors.  You can check out my progress on this page.

My main source of appropriate new-to-me books have been these lists from AICL.

I also am hoping to read many of the AIYLA winners.

Beyond that, I am also looking at authors.  Cynthia Leitich-Smith is now on auto-buy for me, and Louise Erdrich‘s historical fiction is a must read.  Anything illustrated by Julie Flett is probably wonderful, and Sherman Alexie is a solid author, as is Joseph Bruchac.  I definitely want to read more Richard Van Camp, even though it’s difficult to get some of his books in the US.

Here’s a great list I recently found: 7 Female American Indian Novelists which goes beyond the well-known and prolific to highlight some lesser-known novelists, including some #ownvoices genre fiction!

If you like graphic novels, this article has links to many Native comic books (plus a lot of cool nerdy pictures).  Another option is the Moonshot anthology which I’m hoping will give me more leads on new-to-me Native graphic novels.

For YA reading, there’s a list over at the School Library Journal: Teen Books by Native Writers to Trumpet Year-Round.

I’ve also been looking at this List of 2016 Releases by Native Authors.  Specific information is not provided on all of the authors, so it will require some more research, but is a good place to start.  I’ve already ordered a copy of The Right to be Cold based on the mostly positive reviews I’ve seen so far.

Although I probably won’t be reading most of these (because I think the majority of the adult #100indigenousbooks I read will be non-fiction), this TBR list also had a lot of new-to-me names.

What other booklists should I be looking at to diversify my reading with more Native authors?

Can anyone recommend some indigenous authors from other parts of the world?  I have a few native Australian authors on my TBR but would love to read some more and don’t have any leads on South American indigenous books.

 

New (to me) Books I’m Excited About

So, I posted a while ago about books that I was excited to read – namely two books I pre-ordered (something I rarely do).  Now that it’s the end of May, both books should be arriving at my door soon!

Lately I’ve been on a bit of a buying spree, so I’m not pre-ordering any more books, but there are a few books that I’m excited about.  Most are new or recent releases, but a few are new-to-me.  Two I already own (so you can look for reviews later this summer). Continue reading “New (to me) Books I’m Excited About”