Web: Racism in America

A few articles to read.

As a side note, I would like to mention that lately it seems my timed posts are off and not all of my “likes” are sticking.  I have still been reading but just noticed these issues today (when there were ten extra scheduled posts in my queue) and am busy, so it may take some time to correct them.  My apologies.

Now on to the articles.

The Most Racist Places in America resized
“The Most Racist Places in America by Google Search” map from the Washington Post

The Most Racist Places in America, According to Google by Christopher Ingraham.

If nothing else, click to this article to see where your hometown (or a major city you’ve visited) falls in private racist opinions.  I also found the methodology of how they decided to measure for racism fascinating.

Geography of Hate: Geotagged Hateful Tweets in the US .

This one is not an article, just a series of maps using tweets to determine relative hate speech in different counties over the US.  I found this interesting as well, although it seems more easily skewed by individual users, and not all tweets are geotagged (probably accounting for the lack of hate speech in some cities).

Three Quarters of Whites Don’t Have Any Non-White Friends by Christopher Ingraham.

Another intriguing and eye-opening article from the Washington Post.  (They do limit the number of free articles you can read per month, so this will be the last I link from them.)

“The implication of these findings is that when we talk about race in our personal lives, we are by and large discussing it with people who look like us.”

How America Spreads the Disease that is Racism by not Confronting Racist Family Members and Friends by April Harter.

I feel like the most important part of this is the racism scale, but the whole article is interesting.  Personally I feel that our education system should be a primary method of confronting racism (see the previous article about social networks) but any method would work.

Todd Robertson photograph
This historic 1992 photograph by Todd Robertson captures an interaction between a young boy in KKK robes and the African-American trooper there to protect his civil liberties.

How a KKK Rally Image Found New Life 20 Years After it was Published by David Griner.

This image has been circulating widely on social media once again the past week.  It’s had a long life because this accidental image says so much about our nation.  There’s even a reflection sheet for teachers to use (PDF).  This article gives a detailed history on the photo and includes reflections from the photographer.

Photographer, Trooper from Klan Rally Image Meet by Andrew Beaujon.

More backstory on the historic image, this time from the trooper portrayed in the photograph.

Sign: It’s NOT All the Same

Sign isn’t universal and English-speaking countries each have different versions of visual, signed language!

I’ve had an interest in sign language for a long time and have been (mostly informally) learning ASL for almost a decade.

wonderstruck-fingerspell-book-cropped
Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick, learn to fingerspell your name or other words in ASL at http://www.scholastic.com/wonderstruck/signs.html

One aspect that many people who aren’t aware of Deaf culture often misunderstand is that there are different types of sign, just like there are different spoken languages.

Continue reading “Sign: It’s NOT All the Same”

Web Wednesday: Updates

Gosh, it feels good to be book blogging again!  I’ve still been reading, but not at my normal volume, and not all diverse, but I do have some reviews to start going up again.  We are still in the thick of things, so I didn’t have much time to read OR post, but if you have any posts you’d like me to read link them in the comments!

If I add anything that is backdated I will let you know by adding to this post or (if it’s a long time after this post) making a new one with links.  Thanks for continuing to read even as I didn’t have much new content in July.

Meanwhile, today I read a post by Kristen Twardowski about Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress.  She points her readers to an interview with Carla by the New York Times.

What jumped out at me the most while reading this interview was this question:

Is there one book that made you a reader?

I often talk about my favorite book, which is “Bright April,” by Marguerite de Angeli. It was about a young African-American girl who was a Brownie with pigtails. And that was me. It was the first book I remember where I really saw myself. I think books are so important as windows to other worlds, but they can and should also be mirrors. For young readers to see themselves in something important like a book, that really makes an impression.

I’ve never heard of this book before, but you can believe it’s high on my TBR now!  Amazingly, there doesn’t seem to be a modern reprint of this 1946 classic, so it’s not widely available.

After a little searching, I was able to discover one branch library that does have this book, however it is marked library use only (unusual for a fiction book), so I suspect that it is in the rare book collection.  This will take a bit more investigation to see if it is possible for me to read it in the library, or if I would need to arrange an appointment to see it, or if it’s not available to the public at all.  It would involve some traveling and a time commitment on my part, so it may be a while before you hear more about this.

In the meantime, I did discover a sweet blog with many pictures from the book, to whet your appetite as we wait for the favorite book of the Librarian of Congress to be reprinted.

Another fascinating website to peruse is the National Library Service, an initiative to provide library services to the visually (and in some cases physically) impaired.

 

Web: Deaf YA and More

Katherine of FableHaven writes about her experiences reading YA as a Korean-American.

She also reviews a book I hadn’t heard of yet called Tone Deaf.  After a bit I found some information about it and an interview with the author on a Deaf book blog, Deaf Characters in Adolescent Literature.

You're Welcome, Universe
You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner.

Based on this review over at Disability in Kidlit, I just ordered a copy of You’re Welcome, Universe, so I was happy to then see that Becca was pleased with the Indian-American representation.  If you’re interested, you can read the first 50 pages here.  I’m looking forward to reading the whole thing.

Web: Zero Discrimination Day

Have you heard of Zero Discrimination Day?

It began as a program promoting healthcare access for people with HIV worldwide.

But people were interested and it began taking on a larger meaning, and now is a day aimed at ending all forms of discrimination.  (PDF)

I had never heard of this until a friend shared it with me yesterday, and with today being Website Wednesday, it was the perfect time to share this information with all of you!

zero-discrimination-day

My favorite article is this one from UpWorthy with 19 big and small things you can do for Zero Discrimination Day.  They have a list of recommended children’s books, signs, and information on simple ways to help people being harassed and stand up for diversity.

A new website that I in particular found very helpful and interesting was Opportunities for White People in the Fight for Racial Justice.  It lists a lot of different ways to advocate for change at various levels and in different areas of our lives.

Of course, one way that bibliophiles can help is by reading diversely, promoting diverse books, and putting our book money towards new diverse books (this is the goal with my Target Picks).

While diversity and discrimination prevention should never be limited to one day a year, I also love days like this that give us opportunities to share resources and reach out to those who might not otherwise be thinking about diversity.

This year for Zero Discrimination Day, my family will be reading books from cultures we’re not very familiar with yet and reflecting on how we can be more inclusive of others this week.

Have you ever heard of Zero Discrimination Day before?  Do you plan to celebrate?

I’d love to hear how your day goes!

Web: In the Public Domain

Anybody who loves 18th century literature has heard of Project Gutenberg and similar online methods of obtaining books which no longer have a copyright, but when we browse these websites, it is often easier to find books with racist commentary or ideologies than to source books by authors of color.  Today I have a few sources to help you.

The list Black Writers in the Public Domain has a variety of genres available mostly through Gutenberg, but also from some other Public Domain sites.

The same website also has a review of a novel called The Conjure Woman, which is set in the antebellum South and was written by a black journalist.

There are two bookshelves available on Project Gutenberg.  One is African-American Writers, and the other (which has some overlap) is the Slavery bookshelf.  The Slavery bookshelf has some international writers, but is mainly about African-American slavery, which means it includes abolitionist writings by white authors.

Following this rabbit hole eventually brought me to The Antislavery Literature Project, which is all about trying to source original texts about the American antislavery movement from a variety of public domain sources and link them in their database.  This includes writings by white abolitionists as well as trying to source a variety of early writings by authors of color.  Their website is helpful for finding items from smaller digitization projects and gives a brief synopsis of each work.

If you’d like to do a unit on poetry by black authors, poets.org is a great starting place.  They have biographies, essays on, and at least one or two poems by everyone from well-known poets like Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou to comparatively newer poets like Claudia Rankine.

This website is full of sources for teachers, including recommended poems for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Black History Month and other occasions, searchable by poetic form.  Get even more in-depth for Black History Month with this part of the site that includes poems, essays, and original source documents.  There are also areas for movements like the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts.  I’ve only covered the African-American areas, but this site is pretty good about including poets from a variety of traditions and ethnic backgrounds; if you’re interested in poetry, it’s definitely worth a look!

Oh, and for a starter, here’s an anthology of poems, The African American Experience.  I’m reading this and a nonfiction book from the first list electronically and enjoying both.